A Most Sincere and Irreverent Letter to John McCain

Dear John McCain,

It seems that you have only listened to half of what the health care experts have told you and then were shamed into cobbling some rhetoric to cover the glaring gaps. Let me help you.

Let’s first go over what is good about your plan. I like most of your tax reform. Tax credits are better than tax deductions. They are fairer and more progressive. However, you still may want to give a small incentive for employers to stay in the game. I would hate to lose their support, and with your plan they might just all get up and leave. If they do it seems that the small government plan you are envisioning may have to grow to fill the gap. But you have the general right idea with tax credits and $2,500 per individual and $5,000 per family is getting close to the price of insurance, but still falls short. Does everyone get this credit? Is it related to income? Does it rise with inflation, or even better yet rise with health care inflation? Just wondering. Those damn details.

Cost reduction. That’s big with you and you are right to emphasize it. We spend too much on health care – over $6,000 per person. Almost double what the next most generous country spent. And some of your ideas are fine. They are the same as your Democratic rivals (good copying skills), and will only nibble at the corners, but important nonetheless. We should invest in electronic health records, have improved coordinated care, generic drugs, re-importation of drugs (very maverick of you), smoking cessation, state flexibility to encourage creativity, increased focus on chronic conditions, tort reform, and Medicaid and Medicare reform. All good suggestions. Your two sentences on each of them really demonstrates your breadth of understanding. And again your competition beat you to the punch on almost all of these. I like the bipartisan spirit, but I was hoping that since cost reduction was your big thing you might have a new trick up your sleeve. I guess your big price reducer is increased competition. So let’s talk about that.

Your plan will cripple the employer-based health care system. Not a bad thing, but since health care accounts for 16% of our GDP and you are recommending pulling the foundation out from under it (I admit a shaky foundation) you might want to say a little more than you want to put health care decisions back in the hands of the patient. So under your plan the patient would select their health plan, right? And you are assuming that the patient has the information to sort through all of the health plans to choose what is best. Surveys on this topic show that the typical person shopping for insurance bases their decision on things that do not reflect quality. How do you plan to educate America on this? Remember for a market system to work you need an informed consumer. The quality reporting systems in America are improving, but any plan that puts the insurance decisions with the consumer better focus more on quality measurement and reporting than you do. I would suggest you expand on that a bit.

Lastly, Elizabeth Edwards. You two have been so cute fighting in your sandbox, but I would listen to her. I think you have. You realized that she is right saying your plan would leave out the sick. Maybe a person with a history of melanoma? We know that insurers compete by avoiding high-risk people. Risk avoidance is where the profits are – not quality delivery systems. That pre-existing condition thing. That age discrimination thing. Shoot foiled again, and you know it. In the last minute you threw in the line, “We will work with the States,” to make sure these people are covered. What does that mean. High risk pools, perhaps? Well, that is really expensive. Under your plan the really high cost people (up to 30% of the national health care bill) would be denied coverage by insurers (remember since they are not under an employers plan they could be denied) and potentially fall into these groups which would be subsidized heavily with tax dollars. Oops, that sounds like a big government plan. So I would suggest you rethink how you are going to pool people together. Did you know that the premise behind insurance is pooling? You have to find a way for the high-risk people to be pooled with the low risk people based on something besides health. That is what employer-based health insurance was all about.

And lastly, many States have their ways of dealing with these issues. For example New York uses community rating. Under your plan with cross-state purchasing these New York plans would all collapse because nobody who is healthy would join. So much for State flexibility.

I would suggest that you go back to the table and provide a bit more detail. Again, I like the tax credits and I am okay with leaving the employer-based model, but you have to have thought through what’s next. I look forward to your third draft.

Sincerely,

Lucas Pauls

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One response to “A Most Sincere and Irreverent Letter to John McCain

  1. Someone should hire you to debate McCain’s policies!

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